Kids Love Musicals! Brochure

Since the program’s inception by an exemplary task force of educators in 2007, Kids Love Musicals! has had three objectives:

… to show how powerful the combination of dance, music and theater can be in the classroom 

… to help each child make their own personal connection with the material in a highly participatory way 

… to support state and national curriculum standards as we captivate and entertain children

Your students will benefit from a Kids Love Musicals! experience because the interdisciplinary workings of musical theater help to nurture the whole child!

Scroll down for more information on how Kids Love Musicals! will enhance learning in your classroom.

Curriculum Benchmarks

Kids Love Musicals! supports countless Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) outcomes, as well as State of Ohio curriculum benchmarks in K-5 English Language Arts, Music, Drama, Dance, Physical Education. Grade-level benchmarks can be downloaded below:

FAQ & Evaluation Materials

HOW IS A KIDS LOVE MUSICALS! RESIDENCY STRUCTURED?

HOW SHOULD I PREPARE FOR THE RESIDENCY?

WHY SHOULD I INCLUDE KIDS LOVE MUSICALS! IN MY CLASSROOM?

WHAT ARE THE LEARNING OUTCOMES OF A KIDS LOVE MUSICALS! RESIDENCY?

Research Study with CWRU

 Does musical theater experience help children with special needs develop socio-emotional skills? Case Western Reserve University’s Schubert Center for Children’s’ Studies collaborated with TMTP to research the effectiveness of Kids Love Musicals! residency programs in special education environments. The study’s findings, recently published in the Journal for Intellectual Studies, suggest that:

  • Students who participate in the residency program make gains in eye contact, turn-taking, engagement, and symbolic flexibility (the ability to think more flexibly about characters and use their imaginations)
  • By tailoring the program for different ability levels, Kids Love Musicals! becomes even more effective in increasing socio-emotional functioning.
  • Gains in socio-emotional skills relating to engagement, turn-taking, and eye contact may even occur in settings outside of the residency program.

Want to know more? Read this one-page poster summary (right) of the study!